MENU

No location available

No location available, 2020 Gumprint on Tengu and Tarantula restoration paper 95×95 cm, 6 pieces Installation view at Wild Mazzini, Torino “No location available”, is an installation that consists of six prints on Japanese restoration paper suspended, divided into two groups of three, and placed on either side of the gallery, where the viewer is placed in the centre. Each print represents a different cross-section (at different heights) of the same island. Half of the prints represent what is above sea level, the other half represent what is below, which stops being considered as territory to fall into an indeterminate underwater oblivion.
The viewer finds himself physically included in the work, on the ideal borderline between these two worlds – emerged and submerged – invited to feel part of this representation. The choice of the red colour used for the performance aims to strengthen this gap between known and unknown, as red in water is the first colour component to be absorbed, disappearing only 5 metres below sea level. This work is part of and continues the investigation of the seabed undertaken by the artist through the three-dimensional works in the “Try again” series.
Read More ›

try again

CAN’T FIND A WAY THERE, TRY AGAIN 2020 3d print, plexiglass, 20x20x15 cm This project is based on a series of 3D models built on ‘unseen’ coordinates from Google Maps: the non-places portrayed in the models represent sections of sea-floor, chosen on the basis of their distance from land and human habitation. Through the process of modelling, printing and in the selection of materials, glitches – consisting of visual and physical interferences – were purposefully inserted in order to further distance these remote places from geographic reality, glitching the ability of the viewer to ever really know the place. In this sense, the ‘glitch’ becomes emblematic of our relationship to knowledge: physically blurring, smudging, contorting the ‘line’ between the mapped and the unknown(able). Unexepectedly, the glitches depicted bring us closer to the non-places of the digital sphere; places that for various reasons, are not accurately mapped. The project thus aims to generate a hybrid space by capturing the relationship between seabed and surface, depth and superficiality, the real and the ideal.
Read More ›

Hic Sunt Dracones

HERE BE DRAGONS 2018-2019 Cyanotype on paper, 10×10 cm | 90 pieces In 1504, an anonymous cartographer engraved a representation of the known world on two conjoined halves of ostrich eggs. The globe is labeled in Latin and includes what were considered exotic territories such as Japan, Brazil and Arabia. North America is depicted as a group of scattered islands. The globe’s lone sentence, above the coast of Southeast Asia, is “Hic Sunt Dracones.” “Here be dragons” was used to label the unknown, to scare or to encourage the most adventorous to go beyond the limits of the map. Even though nowadays there are no more unknown places or dragon’s lands, it wouldn’t be correct to say that every corner of our planet have been mapped. This serie explores all the unmapped places – for military, political or geographic reasons – marked as glitches on the online maps and it aims to create a second layer, made of unknown.
Read More ›

Takuu Atoll

Takuu Atoll Gumprint and movable type print on japanese restoration paper 7gr / m2, plexiglass, lead, nylon thread Installation of environmental dimensions (4 sheets 100x100cm each, plexiglass case 13x23x16 cm) Takuu atoll, in Papua New Guinea, is sinking. Due to global warming and rising sea levels this cluster of islands is gradually disappearing. In this piece, the topography of the atoll has been replaced by screenshots of interferences taken from online maps, through these interferences the shape of the island breaks up and recomposes, like a blurred memory. Legends say that the Takuu atoll was built by spirits with the bones of Oceanus, and for that reason many of its inhabitants refuse to abandon it, resisting the force of the tides by building dams with dry branches and stones. The cultural and musical heritage of this island is rich with tradition, and composed of thousands of songs handed down from generation to generation. This project investigates the identity of Takuu’s people, that despite having resisted colonisation for centuries, cannot be separated from the impact of their geographical realities. All that will remain of it will be its geographical coordinates.
Read More ›

piano B

Plan B Gelatin silver print on baryta and polythene paper, 88 pieces, cm 20×20 each, water, plastic bowl, installation of environmental dimensions A raised hand: a direction, a greeting, a desire, an intonation, a victory, an urgent cry for help, a threat, a blessing, a presence. A precariously balanced image, just waiting to be looked at, suspended on a judgment full of uncertainties. Only in this condition of apparent fragility the image finally turns into a free, lightweight tool which accompanies the eye through an in-time journey and allows to see things as a part of a process. Clinging and determined to preserve its attachement to its own profiles, the image is wise enough to understand the right moment to jump and gloriously return to the hands of those who recognise themselves in it.
Read More ›

Autoritratti a memoria

My face blends with that of the passerby, who has a crucial role in my analysis, given the speed at which we observe people around us every day, without being able to memorize their features. The figure becomes, therefore, a shadow, a non-defined presence, only carrying the memory of a mere perception.
Read More ›

Studi su sconosciuti

This series is a part of a personal archive of various printing techniques with dark room analogical photography. The work process is based on reprinting and re-working the old images. I want to represent the image of the outsiders, the forgotten ones and give them new identity.
Read More ›

Frammenti

The “fragments” are details which becomes abstraction. The purpose is to show once again the everyday life under a new point of view.
Read More ›